Why aren’t we spending more on public health?

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"Instead of continually complaining about how much is being spent on health care with little to show for it, maybe...

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Posted by David Fouse (Discussions: 1, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 29, 2018 12:00 am
Category: Public Health
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I agree. Getting upstream and investing in public health is always more cost-effective....but if that happened where would that leave big Pharma and insurance companies?
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Posted by Erica Ahmed,MA,MS (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 28, 2018 8:00 pm
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Great data to support funding public health programs
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Posted by Liz Mason (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 30, 2018 8:00 pm
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Fresh organic nutrition, a better rhythm for work and sleep, less blue light in the evening and a reasonable amount of daily walk into nature would be the most valuable contributions to public health!
Also more protection against pollution - chemical as well as noise and light pollution, would be a great addition.
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Posted by Maximilian Moser (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 30, 2018 8:00 pm
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Not to forget plant dominated diet, as a recent study shows:
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-05/pcfr-nrh053018.php
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Posted by Maximilian Moser (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 30, 2018 8:00 pm
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So true ...
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Posted by Lynn Beath (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 30, 2018 8:00 pm
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Completely agree. Does APHA have any specific infographics that speak to this?
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Posted by Deb Robinson (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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Best Return on Investment there is!
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Posted by Marianne Buchelli (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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I think this a challenge to most health care systems around the world. There is a huge budgetary burden when it comes to financing for health care. Recently most govts spend more money on treating and managing non-communicable diseases and the Americas inclusive yet most of these diseases are nutrition related and preventable. If these governments would invest in public health especially prevention mechanism, like health promotion, nutrition education(public health food and nutrition) and also focus on family farming systems and organic urban farming which is less conventional and employs crop diversity this would reduce on the heavy use of pesticides which might be the probable causes of most cancers. These models will be less costly if we look and the economics of treating a non-communicable disease like cancer and that of preventing it.
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Posted by Bamulanzeki Wilson (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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It would be fantastic if, in our life time, there would be core funding for public health to focus on the 10 essential services of public health instead of chasing the same grant funding as health care and nonprofit organizations.
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Posted by Abbie Baker-MPH (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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I agree. However, how can we get donors to focus their attention to where the greater need is, public health programs and initiatives?
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Posted by Princess Mannie Quoi (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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Agree with the title. I believe health departments have insufficient funding, barely to maintain basic communicable diseases programs, not much on prevention and policy change initiatives. These actions may be triggered by political issues of the decision makers in office who know little about the great and long-range impacts of public health initiatives.
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Posted by Patricia Juarez-Carrillo (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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I totally agree!. Just think about it licensed professional counselors versus Public Health clinical therapists. We have so much to offer than mental health and counseling. We offer interventions for Behavioral Health which includes Mental Health, chronic illnesses, infectious diseases, disparity issues and so much more... . This is why I went into practice for myself as a clinician
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Posted by Dr. Mercedes M. Williams, DBH, MPH, CP (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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Perhaps population health is a more strategic solution?
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Posted by Patrick Palmieri (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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Population Health is an important part of the solution, as are hospitals, mental health, Public Health, etc. Maybe "Population health" would be sexier to funders, legislators, etc, in this day and time and that is how we steer future funding to Public Health.
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Posted by Dr. Susan Haynes Little, RN, PHNA-BC (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on May 31, 2018 8:00 pm
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If you want healthy and happy society and many many smiling faces with full pledge capacities and power@invest on public health.
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Posted by Sayed M Saeed (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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I definitely agree! However, until we can get the “buy in” from politicians, key stakeholders, and society in general, I believe we will constantly be fighting this.
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Posted by Jaimi Mimi Allen (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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Yes, definitely an uphill battle.
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Posted by Dr. Susan Haynes Little, RN, PHNA-BC (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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Agree
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Posted by Nelson Pace, PhD, SM (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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One of the challenges is that we need to brand public health as more than health care. Most non-health professionals and elected officials think public health IS health care.
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Posted by Matthew Cross Guillen (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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Because it can be hard to convince governmental decision-makers, organizational leadership and the general public that “treating” illness that has not yet occurred is a better return on investment than what has already set in. As an example, think about it. Spend a lifetime with healthy eating habits, or spend your older adult years with a multitude of medicine pills because you didn’t?#anounceofpreventionisworthapoundofcure
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Posted by Eveliz Metellus (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 1, 2018 8:00 pm
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I think that the answer lies with us public and population health actors. No government is going to hand over funds just because we say it is a good idea. This call has been going on now for some 30 years since the late 1980s (Ottawa Charter) or even before. Two major issues. One is political and stems from basic systems analysis work which indicates that the generation who clamoured for preventative action during the 1980s are now clamouring for curative and palliative care funds in old age. Second is that we need to make the economic case for the benefits. It is not about saying it is obviously good but of presenting scientifically sound economic cases. Our evaluation efforts (when we do them) must be not only for improvements in health outcomes but also for their economic worth. The branch of Government that allocates funds to various Government Departments, typically economists in Ministries of Finance, need to be convinced on the marginal returns of societal investments.
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Posted by Edouard Tursan d'Espaignet (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 2, 2018 8:00 pm
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Agree. How do we more effectively convey the increased benefit of preventing medical problems over simply treating them when quantitatively demonstrating the success of prevention efforts can be a lengthy process (less instant gratification)?
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Posted by Shelby Parilla (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 4, 2018 8:00 pm
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Because when prevention works, the absence of the problem pushes bureaucrats to thinking the problem is over and they stop funding prevention.
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Posted by Dr. Raymond G. Whitham DrMéd, DrVét, MPH (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 6, 2018 8:00 pm
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I would agree that there are two issues going on. There are both social and economical issues to be considered here. While, social policies are initiated to help alleviate population health disparities and social determinants. Economic policies promoting growth result in the cutting of social policies. More needs to be done to incentivize and encourage the consideration of health outcomes.
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Posted by Yolonda Freeman-Hildreth PA-C, MBA (Discussions: 0, Comments: 2)
Replied on June 6, 2018 8:00 pm
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Adequate health prevention is essential to decrease chronic diseases and improve public health. Thank you for sharing.
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Posted by TC Ramsey (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 9, 2018 8:00 pm
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After almost 30 years working in the field it comes down to greed. Disease pays. Health & prevention does not. Plain & simple reason why they won't ever collaborate in any, more really meaningful manner. But I will go down fighting the good fight!
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Posted by Melissa Miranda Craig (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 12, 2018 8:00 pm
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A systematic way to quantify the long-term downstream benefits of vaccine prevention and it’s spillover effects on other sectors would aid policy makers invest in this public health intervention.
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Posted by Preeti Zanwar (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 13, 2018 8:00 pm
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Prevention does not have a timely ROI- we need to have strong, data driven value propositions in which to shift decision-makers into fund allocations of public programs that will yield a return.
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Posted by Colleen McGregor (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 14, 2018 8:00 pm
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Sooo funny i was just thinking about this, just to scroll down to read something about it.
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Posted by Afua Konadu-Yiadom (Discussions: 0, Comments: 1)
Replied on June 16, 2018 8:00 pm
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Yes prevention is the key to keeping people healthy, so spending on health care can ensure better health for the US population i.e. returns billions spent to keep people hospitalized
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Posted by Thomas Plant (Discussions: 0, Comments: 3)
Replied on June 17, 2018 8:00 pm
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