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The following is a list of Clarivate Citation candidates considered likely to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.[1] Since 2023, thirteen out of 95 citation laureates starting in 2008 have eventually been awarded a Nobel Prize: Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak (2009), Ralph M. Steinman (posthumously), Bruce Beutler and Jules A. Hoffmann (2011), Shinya Yamanaka (2012), James Rothman and Randy Schekman (2013), Yoshinori Ohsumi (2016), James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo (2018), and David Julius (2021).

Laureates

Citation Laureates Nationality Motivations Institute
2008[2]
Shizuo Akira
(born 1953)
 Japan "for their research on toll-like receptors and innate immunity." Osaka University

2011
Bruce Beutler
(born 1957)
 United States Scripps Research Institute

2011
Jules A. Hoffmann
(born 1941)
 France French National Centre for Scientific Research
Victor Ambros
(born 1953)
 United States "for their discovery and analysis of the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in gene regulation." University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School
Gary Ruvkun
(born 1952)
 United States Harvard Medical School
Rory Collins
(born 1955)
 United Kingdom "for their contributions to clinical medicine and epidemiology through the development and application of meta-analysis." University of Oxford
Richard Peto
(born 1943)
 United Kingdom
2009[3]

2009
Elizabeth Blackburn
(born 1948)
 Australia
 United States
"for their roles in the discovery of and pioneering research on telomeres and telomerases." University of California, San Francisco

2009
Carol W. Greider
(born 1961)
 United States Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

2009
Jack W. Szostak
(born 1952)
 Canada
 United States

2013
James Rothman
(born 1950)
 United States "for their research on cellular membrane trafficking." Yale University

2013
Randy Schekman
(born 1948)
 United States
Seiji Ogawa
(born 1934)
 Japan "for his fundamental discoveries leading to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has revolutionized basic research in brain science and diagnosis in clinical medicine." Ogawa Laboratories for Brain Function Research
2010[4]
Douglas L. Coleman
(1931–2014)
 United States "for the discovery of leptin, a hormone regulating appetite and metabolism." Jackson Laboratory
Jeffrey M. Friedman
(born 1954)
 United States
Ernest McCulloch
(1926–2011)
 Canada "for the discovery of stem cells and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells." Ontario Cancer Institute
James E. Till
(born 1931)
 Canada

2012
Shinya Yamanaka
(born 1962)
 Japan

2011
Ralph M. Steinman
(1943–2011)
 Canada "for the discovery of dendritic cells, key regulators of immune response." Rockefeller University
2011[5]
Brian Druker
(born 1955)
 United States "for their development of imatinib and dasatinib, revolutionary, targeted treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia."
Charles Sawyers
(born 1959)
 United States
Nicholas Lydon
(born 1957)
 United Kingdom
  • AnaptysBio
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Robert S. Langer
(born 1948)
 United States "for their pioneering research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine." Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Joseph P. Vacanti
(born 1948)
 United States
Jacques Miller
(born 1931)
 France
 Australia
"for his discovery of the function of the thymus and the identification of T cells and B cells in mammalian species."
Robert L. Coffman
(born 1948)
 United States "for their discovery of two types of T lymphocytes, TH1 and TH2, and their role in regulating host immune response." Dynavax Technologies
Timothy Mosmann
(born 1949)
 United States University of Rochester
2012[6]
Charles David Allis
(1951–2023)
 United States "for fundamental discoveries concerning histone modifications and their role in genetic regulation." Rockefeller University
Michael Grunstein
(born 1946)
 United States University of California, Los Angeles
Anthony R. Hunter
(born 1943)
 United Kingdom
 United States
"for the discovery of tyrosine phosphorylation and contributions to understanding protein kinases and their role in signal transduction."
Tony Pawson
(1952–2013)
 Canada "for identification of the phosphotyrosine binding SH2 domain and demonstrating its function in protein-protein interactions." University of Toronto
Richard Hynes
(born 1944)
 United Kingdom "for pioneering discoveries of cell adhesion molecules, Hynes and Ruoslahti for integrins and Takeichi for cadherins."
Erkki Ruoslahti
(born 1940)
 Finland University of California, Santa Barbara
Masatoshi Takeichi
(born 1943)
 Japan Riken Institute of Physical and Chemical Research
2013[7]
Adrian Bird
(born 1947)
 United Kingdom "for their fundamental discoveries concerning DNA methylation and gene expression." University of Edinburgh
Howard Cedar
(born 1943)
 Israel
 United States
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Aharon Razin
(1935–2019)
 Israel
Daniel J. Klionsky
(born 1958)
 United States "for elucidating the molecular mechanisms and physiological function of autophagy." University of Michigan
Noboru Mizushima
(born 1966)
 Japan University of Tokyo

2016
Yoshinori Ohsumi
(born 1945)
 Japan Tokyo Institute of Technology
Dennis Slamon
(born 1948)
 United States "for his pioneering research identifying the HER-2/neu oncogene, leading to more effective cancer therapy." University of California, Los Angeles
2014[8]
James E. Darnell]
(born 1930)
 United States "for fundamental discoveries concerning eukaryotic transcription and gene regulation." Rockefeller University
Robert G. Roeder
(born 1942)
 United States
Robert Tjian
(born 1949)
 Hong Kong
 United States

2021
David Julius
(born 1955)
 United States "for elucidating molecular mechanisms of pain sensation." University of California, San Francisco
Charles Lee
(born 1969)
 South Korea "for their discovery of large-scale copy number variation and its association with specific diseases." Jackson Laboratory
Stephen W. Scherer
(born 1964)
 Canada University of Toronto
Michael Wigler
(born 1947)
 United States Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
2015[9]
Jeffrey I. Gordon
(born 1947)
 United States "for demonstrating the relationship between the human gut microbiome and physiology, metabolism, and nutrition." Washington University in St. Louis
Kazutoshi Mori
(born 1958)
 Japan "for independently identifying the mechanism by which unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are detected and corrected." Kyoto University
Peter Walter
(born 1954)
 Germany
 United States
Alexander Rudensky
(born 1956)
 United States "for their seminal discoveries concerning the nature and function of regulatory T cells and the transcription factor Foxp3."
Shimon Sakaguchi
(born 1951)
 Japan Osaka University
Ethan M. Shevach
(born 1943)
 United States National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
2016[10]

2018
James P. Allison
(born 1948)
 United States "for explaining how CD28 and CTLA-4 are regulators of T cell activation, modulating immune response." University of Texas
Jeffrey Bluestone
(born 1954)
 United States University of California, San Francisco
Craig B. Thompson
(born 1953)
 United States Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Gordon J. Freeman
(born ?)
 United States "for elucidating programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its pathway, which has advanced cancer immunotherapy." Harvard Medical School

2018
Tasuku Honjo
(born 1942)
 Japan Kyoto University
Arlene Sharpe
(born 1953)
 United States
Michael N. Hall
(born 1953)
 United States
  Switzerland
"for discoveries of the growth regulator Target of Rapamycin (TOR) and the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)." University of Basel
David M. Sabatini
(born 1968)
 United States
Stuart Schreiber
(born 1956)
 United States
2017[11]
Lewis C. Cantley
(born 1949)
 United States "for discovery of the signaling pathway phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and elucidation of its role in tumor growth." Weill Cornell Medical College
Karl J. Friston
(born 1959)
 United Kingdom "for fundamental contributions to the analysis of brain imaging data, specifically through statistical parametric mapping and voxel-based morphometry." University College London
Yuan Chang-Moore
(born 1959)
 Taiwan
 United States
"for their discovery of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8)." University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
Patrick S. Moore
(born 1956)
 United States
2018[12]
Minoru Kanehisa
(born 1948)
 Japan "for contributions to bioinformatics, specifically for his development of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes andGenomes (KEGG)." Kyoto University
Solomon H. Snyder
(born 1938)
 United States "for his identification of receptors for many neurotransmitters and psychotropic agents." Johns Hopkins University
Napoleone Ferrara
(born 1956)
 Italy
 United States
"for the discovery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key regulator of angiogenesis." University of California, San Diego
2019[13]
Hans Clevers
(born 1957)
 Netherlands "for research on the Wnt signaling pathway and its role in stem cells and cancer." Hubrecht Institute for Developmental Biology and Stem Cell Research
John Kappler
(born 1943)
 United States "for their discovery of T-cell tolerance by clonal elimination in the thymus." National Jewish Health
Philippa Marrack-Kappler
(born 1945)
 United Kingdom
Ernst Bamberg
(born 1940)
 Germany "for contributions to the invention and development of optogenetics." Max Planck Institute of Biophysics
Karl Deisseroth
(born 1971)
 United States
Gero Miesenböck
(born 1965)
 Austria Oxford University
2020[14]
Pamela J. Bjorkman
(born 1956)
 United States "for determining the structure and function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins, a landmark discovery in molecular immunology that has contributed to drug and vaccine development." California Institute of Technology
Jack L. Strominger
(born 1925)
 United States Harvard University
Yusuke Nakamura
(born 1952)
 Japan "for pioneering research developing and applying genetic polymorphic markers and for contributions to genome-wide association studies, both heralding personalized approaches to cancer treatment."
Huda Zoghbi
(born 1954)
 Lebanon
 United States
"for discoveries on the pathogenesis of neurological disorders including the genetic origins of Rett syndrome."
2021[15]
Jean-Pierre Changeux
(born 1936)
 France "for contributions to our understanding of neuroreceptors and especially the identification of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its allosteric properties."
Toshio Hirano
(born 1947)
 Japan "for discovery of interleukin-6, description of its physiological and pathological actions, that has contributed to drug development."
Tadamitsu Kishimoto
(born 1939)
 Japan Osaka University
Karl Johnson
(born 1929)
 United States "for identification and isolation of the Hantaan virus (hantavirus), agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome." University of New Mexico
Ho Wang Lee
(1928–2022)
 South Korea Korea University|National Academy of Sciences
2022[16]
Masato Hasegawa
(born 1961)
 Japan "for the identification of TDP-43, a pathological signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and for other contributions to the study of neurodegenerative diseases." Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science
Virginia Man-Yee Lee
(born 1945)
 China
 United States
University of Pennsylvania
Mary-Claire King
(born 1946)
 United States "for demonstrating inherited susceptibility for breast and ovarian cancer and discovering the role played by mutations of the BRCA1 gene." University of Washington
Stuart Orkin
(born 1946)
 United States "for foundational research on the genetic basis of blood diseases and for advancing gene therapy for sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia."
2023[17]
Carl H. June
(born 1953)
 United States "for breakthrough research advancing chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for the treatment of cancer." University of Pennsylvania
Steven A. Rosenberg
(born 1940)
 United States National Cancer Institute
Michel Sadelain
(born 1960)
 United States Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Rob Knight
(born 1976)
 New Zealand "for computational and experimental research revealing the complex microbial ecosystems of the human body." University of California San Diego
Emmanuel Mignot
(born 1959)
 France "for genetic and physiological studies of the sleep/wake cycle and the discovery of hypocretin/orexin as important regulators of sleep involved in the cause of narcolepsy." Stanford University
Clifford B. Saper
(born 1965)
 United States Harvard Medical School
Masashi Yanagisawa
(born 1960)
 Japan
 United States
University of Tsukuba

References

  1. ^ "Acquisition of the Thomson Reuters Intellectual Property and Science Business by Onex and Baring Asia Completed". PR Newswire. October 3, 2016.
  2. ^ "The Scientific Business of Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 3 October 2008.
  3. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 24 September 2009.
  4. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 21 September 2010.
  5. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". ACN Newswire. 21 September 2011.
  6. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2012 Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 19 September 2012.
  7. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2013 Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 25 September 2013.
  8. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2014 Nobel Laureates, Researchers Forecast for Nobel Recognition". PR Newswire. 25 September 2014.
  9. ^ "Thomson Reuters Forecasts Nobel Prize Winners". PR Newswire. 24 September 2015.
  10. ^ "Web of Science Predicts 2016 Nobel Prize Winners". PR Newswire. 21 September 2016.
  11. ^ "The 2017 Clarivate Citation Laureates". Clarivate Analytics. 20 September 2017. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017.
  12. ^ "The 2018 Clarivate Citation Laureates" (PDF). Clarivate Analytics. 20 September 2018.
  13. ^ "The 2019 Clarivate Citation Laureates" (PDF). Clarivate Analytics. 24 September 2019.
  14. ^ "Clarivate Reveals 2020 Citation Laureates - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 23 September 2020.
  15. ^ "Clarivate Unveils Citation Laureates 2021 - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 22 September 2021.
  16. ^ "Clarivate Reveals Citation Laureates 2022 - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 21 September 2022.
  17. ^ "Clarivate Unveils Citation Laureates 2023 – Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". Clarivate Analytics. September 19, 2023.

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