Informatics Educational Institutions & Programs

The following is a list of Clarivate Citation candidates considered likely to win the Nobel Prize in Physics.[1]

Laureates

Citation Laureates Nationality Motivations Institute
2008[2]
 
2010
Andre Geim
(born 1958)
  Netherlands
  United Kingdom
"for their discovery and analysis of graphene." University of Manchester
 
2010
Konstantin Novoselov
(born 1974)
  Russia
  United Kingdom
Vera Rubin
(1928–2016)
  United States "for her pioneering research indicating the existence of dark matter in the universe." Carnegie Institution of Washington
 
2020
Roger Penrose
(born 1931)
  United Kingdom "for their related discoveries of, Penrose-tilings and quasicrystals, respectively." University of Oxford
 
2011
Dan Shechtman
(born 1941)
  Israel
2009[3]
Yakir Aharonov
(born 1932)
  Israel "for their discovery of the Aharonov–Bohm effect and the related Berry phase, respectively."
Michael Berry
(born 1941)
  United Kingdom University of Bristol
Juan Ignacio Cirac Sasturain
(born 1965)
  Spain "for their pioneering research on quantum optics and quantum computing." Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics
Peter Zoller
(born 1952)
  Austria
John Pendry
(born 1943)
  United Kingdom "for their prediction and discovery of negative refraction." Imperial College London
Sheldon Schultz
(1933–2017)
  United States University of California, San Diego
David R. Smith
(born 1964)
  United States Duke University
2010[4]
Charles L. Bennett
(born 1956)
  United States "for discoveries deriving from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), including the age of the universe, its topography, and its composition."
Lyman Page
(born 1957)
  United States Princeton University
David Spergel
(born 1961)
  United States
Thomas Ebbesen
(born 1954)
  Norway "for observation and explanation of the transmission of light through subwavelength holes, which ignited the field of surface plasmon photonics."
 
2011
Saul Perlmutter
(born 1959)
  United States "for discoveries of the accelerating rate of the expansion of the universe, and its implications for the existence of dark energy."
 
2011
Adam Riess
(born 1969)
  United States
 
2011
Brian Schmidt
(born 1967)
  United States Australian National University
2011[5]
 
2022
Alain Aspect
(born 1947)
  France "for their tests of Bell inequalities and research on quantum entanglement."
 
2022
John Clauser
(born 1942)
  United States Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
 
2022
Anton Zeilinger
(born 1945)
  Austria
Sajeev John
(born 1957)
  Canada "for their invention and development of photonic band gap materials." University of Toronto
Eli Yablonovitch
(born 1946)
  United States University of California, Berkeley
Hideo Ohno
(born 1954)
  Japan "for contributions to ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors."
2012[6]
Charles H. Bennett
(born 1943)
  United States "for their pioneering description of a protocol for quantum teleportation, which has since been experimentally verified." IBM Research
Gilles Brassard
(born 1955)
  Canada University of Montreal
William Wootters
(born 1951)
  United States Williams College
Leigh Canham
(born 1958)
  United Kingdom "for discovery of photoluminescence in porous silicon." University of Birmingham
Stephen E. Harris
(born 1936)
  United States "for the experimental demonstration of electromagnetically induced transparency (Harris) and of 'slow light' (Harris and Hau)." Stanford University
Lene Hau
(born 1959)
  Denmark Harvard University
2013[7]
 
2013
François Englert
(born 1932)
  Belgium "for their prediction of the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson."
 
2013
Peter W. Higgs
(born 1929)
  United Kingdom University of Edinburgh
Hideo Hosono
(born 1953)
  Japan "for his discovery of iron-based superconductors." Tokyo Institute of Technology
Geoffrey Marcy
(born 1954)
  United States "for their discoveries of extrasolar planets." University of California, Berkeley
 
2019
Michel Mayor
(born 1942)
   Switzerland University of Geneva
 
2019
Didier P. Queloz
(born 1966)
   Switzerland
2014[8]
Charles L. Kane
(born 1963)
  United States "for theoretical and experimental research on the quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators." University of Pennsylvania
Laurens W. Molenkamp
(born 1956)
  Netherlands University of Würzburg
Shoucheng Zhang
(1963–2018)
  China
  United States
Stanford University
James F. Scott
(1942–2020)
  United States "for their pioneering research on ferroelectric memory devices (Scott) and new multiferroic materials (Ramesh and Tokura)." University of Cambridge
Ramamoorthy Ramesh
(born 1960)
  United States University of California, Berkeley
Yoshinori Tokura[a]
(born 1954)
  Japan University of Tokyo
Peidong Yang
(born 1971)
  China
  United States
"for his contributions to nanowire photonics including the creation of first nanowire nanolaser."
2015[9]
Paul Corkum
(born 1943)
  Canada "for contributions to the development of attosecond physics." University of Ottawa
Ferenc Krausz
(born 1962)
  Hungary
Deborah S. Jin
(1968–2016)
  United States "for pioneering research on atomic gases at ultra-cold temperatures and the creation of the first fermionic condensate." University of Colorado
Zhong Lin Wang
(born 1961)
  China
  United States
"for his invention of piezotronic and piezophototronic nanogenerators." Georgia Institute of Technology
2016[10]
Marvin L. Cohen
(born 1935)
  United States "for theoretical studies of solid materials, prediction of their properties, and especially for the empirical pseudopotential method."
Ronald Drever
(1931–2017)
  United Kingdom "for the development of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) that made possible the detection of gravitational waves." California Institute of Technology
 
2017
Kip Thorne
(born 1940)
  United States
 
2017
Rainer Weiss
(born 1932)
  United States
Celso Grebogi
(born 1947)
  Brazil "for their description of a control theory of chaotic systems, the OGY method." University of Aberdeen
Edward Ott
(born 1941)
  United States University of Maryland
James A. Yorke
(born 1941)
  United States
2017[11]
Phaedon Avouris
(born 1945)
  Greece "for seminal contributions to carbon-based electronics." Thomas J. Watson Research Center
Cornelis Dekker
(born 1949)
  Netherlands Delft University of Technology
Paul McEuen
(born 1963)
  United States Cornell University
Mitchell Feigenbaum
(1944–2019)
  United States "for pioneering discoveries in nonlinear and chaotic physical systems and for identification of the Feigenbaum constants." Rockefeller University
Rashid Sunyaev
(born 1943)
  Russia
  Germany
"for his profound contributions to our understanding of the universe, including its origins, galactic formation processes, disk accretion of black holes, and many other cosmological phenomena."
2018[12]
David Awschalom
(born 1956)
  United States "for observation of the spin Hall effect in semiconductors." University of Chicago
Arthur Gossard
(1935–2022)
  United States University of California, Santa Barbara
Sandra Faber
(born 1944)
  United States "for pioneering methods to determine the age, size and distance of galaxies and for other contributions to cosmology." University of California, Santa Cruz
Yury Gogotsi
(born 1961)
  Ukraine "for discoveries advancing the understanding and development of carbon-based materials, including for capacitive energy storage and understanding the mechanisms of operation of supercapacitors." Drexel Nanomaterials Institute
Rodney S. Ruoff
(born 1957)
  United States Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Patrice Simon
(born 1969)
  France Université Paul Sabatier
2019[13]
Artur Ekert
(born 1961)
  Poland
  United States
"for contributions to quantum computation and quantum cryptography."
Tony Heinz
(born 1956)
  United States "for pioneering research on optical and electronic properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials."
John Perdew
(born 1943)
  United States "for advances in density functional theory of electronic structure, revealing 'nature's glue'." Temple University
2020[14]
Thomas L. Carroll
(born ?)
  United States "for research in nonlinear dynamics including synchronization of chaotic systems." United States Naval Research Laboratory
Louis M. Pecora
(born 1947)
  United States
Hongjie Dai
(born 1966)
  China
  United States
"for fabrication and novel applications of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes." Stanford University
Alex Zettl
(born 1956)
  United States
Carlos Frenk
(born 1951)
  Mexico
  United Kingdom
"for their fundamental studies of galaxy formation and evolution, cosmic structure, and dark matter halos." Durham University
Julio Navarro
(born 1962)
  Argentina
  Canada
University of Victoria
Simon White
(born 1951)
  United Kingdom Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics
2021[15]
Alexei Kitaev
(born 1963)
  Russia
  United States
"for topological quantum computation, in which quantum information is encoded and protected using topological properties of many-body systems." California Institute of Technology
Mark Newman
(born ?)
  United Kingdom
  United States
"for wide-ranging research on network systems including work on community structure and random graph models." University of Michigan
 
2021
Giorgio Parisi
(born 1948)
  Italy "for ground-breaking discoveries in quantum chromodynamics and in the study of complex disordered systems." Sapienza University of Rome
2022[16]
Immanuel Bloch
(born 1972)
  Germany "for ground-breaking research on quantum many-body systems using ultra-cold atomic and molecular gases, opening the way to quantum simulations of 'artificial solids'."
Stephen Quake]
(born 1969)
  United States "for contributions to the physics of fluid phenomena on the nanoliter scale."
Takashi Taniguchi
(born 1959)
  Japan "for fabrication of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride crystals, the availability of which enabled a revolution in research on the electronic behavior of two-dimensional materials." National Institute for Materials Science
Kenji Watanabe
(born 1969)
  Japan
2023[17]
Sharon C. Glotzer
(born)
  United States "for demonstrating the role of entropy in the self-assembly of matter and for introducing strategies to control the assembly process to engineer new materials." University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Federico Capasso
(born 1949)
  Italy
  United States
"for pioneering research on photonics, plasmonics, and metasurfaces, as well as contributions to the invention of and improvements on the quantum cascade laser." Harvard University, Cambridge
Stuart S. P. Parkin
(born 1955)
  United Kingdom
  Germany
"for research on spintronics and specifically the development of racetrack memory for increased data storage density." Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Notes

  1. ^ Tokura was previously named a Citation Laureate in 2002.

References

  1. ^ "Acquisition of the Thomson Reuters Intellectual Property and Science Business by Onex and Baring Asia Completed". PR Newswire. October 3, 2016.
  2. ^ "The Scientific Business of Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 3 October 2008.
  3. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 24 September 2009.
  4. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 21 September 2010.
  5. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobel Laureates". ACN Newswire. 21 September 2011.
  6. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2012 Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 19 September 2012.
  7. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2013 Nobel Laureates". PR Newswire. 25 September 2013.
  8. ^ "Thomson Reuters Predicts 2014 Nobel Laureates, Researchers Forecast for Nobel Recognition". PR Newswire. 25 September 2014.
  9. ^ "Thomson Reuters Forecasts Nobel Prize Winners". PR Newswire. 24 September 2015.
  10. ^ "Web of Science Predicts 2016 Nobel Prize Winners". PR Newswire. 21 September 2016.
  11. ^ "The 2017 Clarivate Citation Laureates". Clarivate Analytics. 20 September 2017. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017.
  12. ^ "The 2018 Clarivate Citation Laureates" (PDF). Clarivate Analytics. 20 September 2018.
  13. ^ "The 2019 Clarivate Citation Laureates" (PDF). Clarivate Analytics. 24 September 2019.
  14. ^ "Clarivate Reveals 2020 Citation Laureates - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 23 September 2020.
  15. ^ "Clarivate Unveils Citation Laureates 2021 - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 22 September 2021.
  16. ^ "Clarivate Reveals Citation Laureates 2022 - Annual List of Researchers of Nobel Class". PR Newswire. 21 September 2022.
  17. ^ "The 2023 Clarivate Citation Laureates"

External links